You Can Call Me Joe - A Joe V Blog
Joe V

Hi, I’m Joe V. The V is for Vadeboncoeur, but no one ever really calls me that (except my business card). That card also calls me the Global Director of Product Development, Marketing and Creative Design for Trek Bicycle. Yep, I am sometimes not really sure what all that means either. I do know that I dig bikes, oatmeal, motorcycles, burritos, the weird things I see along the way, my family and my job. I get to travel the world helping make great bikes, so it’s a pretty great gig.



July 14, 2014

Chips not Frites, and TDF - Samsung, but no Yellow Ledbetter!

I am really certain that the Hobbits's live in the Shire. I am not really sure if the Shire is a real place or not, but I know that Hobbits's are real.  I know, trust me, I know.  Of course I have not been to all of the places that Hobbits have been, but I am pretty certain that even though we all know that Mordor exists - clearly Rivendell is made up.  I mean come on, isn't it unlikely that elves would live in a place that is so easily found by Hobbits?

I mean seriously, what is a hobbit?  With those feet, they cannot possibly fight off Orcs.  Of course, that is not really expected of them, just carrying things on chains. 

But, I think I have found what is probaby the place that the Shire resides.  I have not found it yet, perse - but I know it is there.  The actual Shire is somewhere in Yorkshire, in the north of England.  You know, the place of weird English and really good pints of ale.  The place of driving on the wrong side of the road (which is of course the left side, as right is right and left is wrong.  It has to do with the whole lefthanded thing.)  Oh, and those pints are glorious by the way.  It is all a bit Dr. Suess you know - Oh, the places you will go. 

IMG_9083
In the USA, we have free range chicken and beef. Apparently Yorkshire has it's own views. Hobbits's beware.
IMG_9085
I mentioned the Pint, didn't I? I had my share.
IMG_9089
Even the pubs were into it. I overheard one of the people there say, "wow you cyclists really do spend money." When it comes to beer baby...

Yorkshire is an incredible place.  Beautiful, green, full of charm, historic etc...  The tour was an amazing experience there.  Every single village came out to see the tour.  Every single village was decorated to the 9's, and manicured to look amazing.  If you have not seen all the photos, take a look here

Every village had yellow banners up, and bicycles painted yellow everywhere, and hand knit jerseys on a string draped across the road, and "Welcome Tour de France" hand painted signs, and names of roads changed to French etc...  Yorkshire loves the Tour de France.  It was really inspiring.  

And wow did the people come out.  As my friend in London says, "English people just love a day out".  That may be so, but they do not come out for a bike race like this anywhere else in the world.  It is estimated that about 9 million people saw the Tour de France from the side of the road in those 3 days in Yorkshire.  Think about that - 9 million people!  Cycling is alive and well, that's for sure.  

It was exciting to be there on that first day and see the old man take the Polka dot.  He really burned every match he had that day to try to get that jersey.  Jens took the Polka Dot jersey in his first tour, and then again in his last tour.  

20140706_101008
Jens looks good in Polka dots. People say that mountains are afraid of Jens. It will be tough to see him retire. "Don't even talk to me about 18, Joe"
IMG_9094
Jens got to ride with this cool dotted SRM unit also. I just wonder what kind of numbers Jens puts out while trying to take the jersey. Ha.

 After the Tour de France stages left the UK, Liz and I moved on to the REAL reason we were there.  On the 8th of July, we went to the Pearl Jam concert in Leeds.  Oh, it was pretty good.  Ha.  You know if you read this occasionally, that I kinda like Pearl Jam.  I mean, I guess they are pretty good.  If you have not seen them live, you owe yourself that.  I have made it a habit the past years of trying to see them somewhere in the world.  This year, I am kinda going overboard with 3 different shows.  But, that is just my view as some people say there is no such thing - you cannot see them too many times.

The band (as they are known now at my house), puts on the most amazing show you have ever seen.  They never play less than 3 hours.  This night they played for 3 hours and 40 minutes.  I think I read somewhere afterward that they played 39 songs.  Towards the end, Eddie's voice was nearly gone. At one point the band conferred and Eddie said they had been asked to stop, but they were having too much fun and "f..k it", we are going to play a few more songs.  Brilliant.

 

20140708_193130
The line to get a tshirt or a poster was stupid long. I would have loved to have one for history, but instead I just have a photo of the poster. Pretty cool, eh?
 

They played some epic versions of songs that I had not heard before.  Sirens was beyond good, the version of Evenflow was incredible, Porch rocked as it always does.  Stone sang don't give me no lip.  Lightning Bolt was stupendous (I cannot believe I did not care for that song originally).  At one point, Liz said "OMG, they are just killing it tonight."  They were.  But, unfortunately they did not play Yellow Ledbetter.  It felt like it was going to come at the end, but instead I think that was when they broke out Alive (I am not sure, it is such a blur - 3.4hours you know).  Wow.  

Oh well, here is to hoping The Band sees this blog entry and plays Yellow Ledbetter at either Milwaukee or Minneapolis.  I mean, come on guys it has been a couple of years since I have been able to hear it live - wtf?  

Next up was 2 days of mountain biking in the Yorkshire Dales.  

20140706_214532

Riding in the Dales of Yorkshire is pretty cool.  I had done it once before, about 10 years ago - it was Liz's first time.  You are riding on ancient Roman roads/paths, lined by hand built stone walls that were built hundreds of years ago by who knows who.  You stop in a pub along the way and have lunch (along with another handcrafted ale).  You climb walls and ride across fields on bridal paths.  You link up bits of singletrack along the river or up on the Moors (beware the Moors, just like American Werewolf in London).  And then do it all again the next day.  There is something really cool about it all.

In the USA, mountain biking is all about finding killer singletrack.  Doesn't really matter what kind, scenic - technical - flowy - steep - flat.  But, it is all about singletrack.  The trail is what is important.  In Europe, I have now found that it can be really more about the destination.  There is a huge vista, or a pub or a castle or...  You do need to give it a try though.  Good fun.

I am not sure you are paying attention though, as they are called chips here.  Chips in America are what come in a bag and are fried and crisp.  Frites or Fries are what is a fried potato.  In the UK, they are eaten with just about everything.  They are not the same as Belgian Frites, but do not even get me started on that.  Frites are just about the perfect food, afterall - (They actually cannot rival a Burrito, but you really cannot get those in Europe... Seriously).

IMG_4614
Dang Good!
Dn-6Q4m4oP1yLslnh7D8FkmTV_IP4rpOb5nlN6C3cvg=w1892-h1064-no
That is some good stuff right there. Hobbits's and the Shire in the background, Orcs somewhere in area, old roman road to ride... great fun.


 

20140709_160703
Feels a bit rickety, but it was cool that this was all available via bike. We just do not have this stuff in USA.
20140710_080144
That would be the Red Lion, pub where we stayed. Upper right corner room was pretty cool.
20140710_190153
Picnic dinner with the Kes clan. That would be the shire out in the distance there. Click the photo.

Then I moved on to the sales meeting in the UK, not much to report there so we will move on to getting back to the 1st rest day at the TDF with Luca and the TFR team. (at this point it is starting to feel like I have been there forever).  

The highlight of that was that I got to go for the rest day ride with the team.  Just a simple little 40k affair, that was done at a similar pace to the lunch ride at Trek.  Yep, even easy days for a world tour team are harder than I sometimes want to go.  It was great fun to ride with a follow car though.  I told Liz that from now on I want a follow car on my rides.  I think she is planning that.

20140715_122640
This is brilliant, as this is the way it always is for me going for a ride. Bikes professionally prepared and set out ready to go, bottles filled, tires filled, follow car with a route already chosen... NOT!
20140714_205738
We introduced a new sponsor and a new cause with the team this past week. Samsung global came on as the mobile sponsor, and that has been crazy fun. I picked up a new Galaxy S5 phone, and Gear watch. Holy cow, is it cool. I did not know what I was missing. I took all these photo's with it this week, and I can tell you the camera completely rocks, and the phone has so many features it will take me a while to figure it out. And do not even get me started on the watch because it is...wow.

Out,

Joe

 

 

 

 

 

This is what I am waiting for.  Watch it and weep.

 


June 15, 2014

Lions and Tigers and Bears!

I think we were in the Enchanted Forest or something, or at least the 100 Acre Woods.  Marti and Stella bounded through the tall grass collecting all the ticks they could in a short period of time.  

Liz: I don't like this forest! It's — it's dark and creepy! We probably need bells or something to keep away the beasts.

Me: Of course, I don't know, but I think it'll get darker before it gets lighter. That is usually the case with night time and day time, but hey - who knows.

Liz: Do — do you suppose we'll meet any wild animals? 

Me: We might, and they will meet us.  When you say Wild, do you mean like the Game of Thrones wild?

Liz: Oh ... Will they be like, dangerous animals?

Me: Some — but mostly lions, and tigers, and bears. 

Liz: Lions? 

Me: Some — but mostly not. 

Liz: And tigers? 

Me: Some — but mostly not.  Oh, but definitely bears. 

Liz: Oh! Lions and tigers and bears! Oh, my!

It goes on from there, but you get the picture.  I do not think we will go to Camelot, it is a silly place.  

If I allow my mind to take me back to the beginning of the week, it all started there.  (It seems so often that these stories start at the beginning.)  A monday evening flight was meant to get me, and my gear, to NC to attend the global media launch of the new Fuel EX and the new Re:Aktiv suspension technology.  It wa going to be a ripsnorting affair, complete with Oskar Blues IPA (thank god it is served in a can, because then I do not have to listen to people tell me that it comes in a glass why do you need a glass?), Burritos, Brevard NC, a boy, a bike and a trail.  Bike and trail are key to all of this of course, although you know that a bike and trail are most often followed by a burrito.  It is all wrapped in tortilla goodness after all.

Of course United decided that I did not really need all the gear I had brought with me.  In fact, they decided I did not need any of the gear I had brought with me.  I think they sent my gear to Croatia or somewhere afar like that.  It came back stinking of cigarettes and speaking some sort of language I could not understand but my olfactory kinda recognized.  

Nonetheless, a tour of Penske racing facilities started out the trip.  Charlotte - they call themselves race city or something like that.  The whole NASCAR thing is a pretty big dealeo there.  I get it, I tend to make better left turns on the motorbike than I do right.  I always prefer a first turn that is left.  But seriously, Penske racing is something worth seeing.  You cannot believe how many chassis that it takes to keep one racer going all season.  Before you come to racecity, you want to quote Cal Naughton - "I like to picture Jesus in a tuxedo T-shirt. 'Cause it says like, I wanna be formal but I’m here to party too. I like to party, so I like my Jesus to party."  After you have been there, you will think differently.  (At least about NASCAR, maybe not about religion.)

The reason Penske is involved is actually the suspension arm of their company.  They make suspension for Formula 1, and they have some of the coolest technology anywhere.  We borrowed some of their technology and worked with Fox to put it in a suspension damper.  We call it Re:Aktiv, I call it through and through superscrandangiousness.  

If you follow this link to Vital MTB, you can get the whole lowdown on the bike.  Formula 1 Meets Mountain Biking. While there you will see pictures, and get graphs and stuff.  They are all telling you something, and if you follow along it probably makes sense.  But, I decided to boil it down even further.

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 7.02.06 AM
If you really want to know much more, you can follow the link above in the text and get much more technical info, if you are so inclined. But, if you remember nothing else, just remember my graph. Re:Aktiv makes riding your MTB more fun. In fact, not much room for something to be more fun.
IMG_8896
Its a jelly donut!

 

After all of that, it was time to go ride.  We made our way up to Brevard NC - 1.  Because the riding there is awesome.  2. Because the Oskar Blues brewery is there.  3.  Because the name is Brevard.  There, we took a beyond awesome 4 hour ride on the new EX and the Re:Aktiv boingers.  I promise you, you have not seen anything yet.  After all, schnozberries taste just like schnozberries.  

In all seriousness, you really have not ridden anything like this. (Unless you were at the launch and have ridden one now.)  Suspension will never be the same.  Plus, it is yellow.

 

IMG_8953
On top of it all, it's yellow!

 

IMG_8970
This is a picture of a guy taking a picture of a guy riding.

  

If you have not ridden in Brevard, you should.  Even if you have ridden there, you have not yet ridden a bike equipped with Re:Aktiv suspension parts yet.  You should.  If you could do both, then that would be even better.  Follow that up with a trip to Oskar Blues and you will be complete.  Tell them Joe sent you.

Hayward.

When I got home from Brevard, Liz and I hopped in the car and blasted up to Hayward.  I had not had a chance yet to ride the really good flowy trails in Hayward yet this year.  The winter was amazingly long, and it has been a long time coming.  The trails have only been open for a few weeks, so not much was missed just yet.  I did miss the Mt. Borah Epic, but that is all so far this year that has gone on up here.  

I had snagged a Re:Aktiv damper from the launch in Brevard (somewhere there is a bike saying - hey, where is my shock?)  When bolted up to my existing Fuel EX 29 that is in my garage, the same silky crazy fun performance was translated over to that bike.  Holy cow - are cows really holy or something?  

Anyway, Liz and I did a big 4hr-ish ride ALL on singletrack on Saturday.  It was glorious fun.  Fast, flowy, super buff trails.  These trails make you feel like a hero always.  Not because they have a lot of vertical, but they just keep going forever.  If you have not yet ridden here, you should because until you experience 100 miles of flowing singletrack, you just do not know what it is like.  

There is a sign on the trail somewhere along the way that claims the CAMBA trails are the longest piece of singletrack in the midwest.  I do not know if that is true or not, but it is on a sign.

IMG_8983
The best of midwest singletrack.

 

IMG_8979
You cannot tell from the photo, but the Re:Aktiv equipped Fuel EX becomes a trail gobbling machine.

 Late in the ride, Liz was in front of me and we were just gabbing about the trail, the cabin, the dogs what the bike was doing, where the kids were and what they were doing, how to use the front brake through a turn, where we hope CAMBA would build a trail next, how we were going to get out and do Rock Lake trail or not on this trip etc...  It was all just basically the stuff you talk about while on a MTB ride.  (We managed to avoid talking about bodily functions though.)

Suddenly, while I was in mid sentence about if Sculpin, or Deviant Dale or Resin was the better IPA (these are all important theories after all.  In fact, the world does not turn most days if those kinds of things are not answered.  Stock prices and politics really do not make the world turn - beer opinions or in my case facts - really do make the world turn after all.  Life is too short to not have good beer, after all you have a limited amount of burritos that you can consume in your life.)  Suddenly, Liz came to an abrupt halt, screeching Bear!  There he was, right in the trail.  Big, black, scared looking and smelly.  I nearly smashed into the back of her, and nearly went right over the bars trying to stop and avoid her.  The Bear, he had had enough.  He bounded off through the woods, crashing through bushes and trees like they were not even there.  Out of sight in a flash.

The bears are there.  Just beyond the edge of the forest.  Waiting for just the smallest of mistakes, and they will pounce.  Just beyond the bears - Lions and Tigers.  

Surrender Dorothy!

Oh My.  

Out - Joe

 

 

Watch these 2 videos below.  In a nutshell they show what is dorky about cycling and what is cool all at the same time.  It shows how your hairstyle matters, how the piano by itself is in fact a solo instrument, and how we all can get a little bit full of ourselves.

Please try to hold down your gag reflex while watching the first video.  Do your best.  I promise, the next video makes it all worth it.  

"Made of corn and dog".  I just wish I could do that wrapping.

Oh, by the way my bag never did show up in NC.  But, as a bonus they called me and told me that they would just have it meet me back in Madison.  So I had that going for me.   Avoid Chicago. 

 


May 22, 2014

Resetting the Matrix!

Maxresdefault
There are two doors. The door to your right leads to the Source and the salvation of Zion. The door to your left leads back to the Matrix, to Moab and the salvation of your species. The problem is choice. But we already know what you are going to do, don't we? - Duh, go for a mountain bike ride...!

 

Over the years I have done a lot of riding in different places around the world.  Moab, Utah, Park City Utah, Boulder, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, California, the Midwest, the eastern USA, North Carolina, Texas, Mexico, Taiwan, China, Australia, Canada, the UK, France, Spain, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Japan, Malaysia, etc. It's a pretty long list. Somewhere along the way, you literally get lost and really cannot remember how you got into all of this.  It is all 2 wheels, but it starts to get a bit numbing.  More roads, more trails, more bike parks...it all blurs.  It's a great life, but somewhere in there it can start to loose its grandeur and its significance.

I have been proud to proclaim along the way in my life a bunch of different announcements about how important things with 2 wheels are to me.  Some of these I am still proud of and others not so much.

A sampling:

-       I love racing my bike.

-       I love riding my 2 wheelers.

-       Any day racing a motorcycle is better than a day not.

-       If it has 2 wheels, I either own one or want one (not as proud of this one as some of the others).

-       The perfect bicycle cannot be built.

-       The perfect ride cannot be had.

-       My butt hurts

-       Lets go for a ride

-       Odd that penguin being there

-       Can I have that piece of fruit

-       Go for a ride

 

In the end, it is about a boy and his bike.  There has been a girl involved through most of it, sometimes a dog, but always a bike. 

 

IMG_8718
The road to Zion (or in this case Moab)!

It is that constant that has worked so well for me.  Yes, you can call it a one track mind – or in my case a 2 wheeled mind.  Ha.

 I am here to tell the story of finding my soul again, unplugging from the Matrix for a bit and getting my Mountain Biker back on. 

Moab.  Just the name says it all.  Never have 2 vowels in the middle of a simple little word, ending with a b no less, been so significant.  Makes it all even more exciting.  Just say it aloud now.  That’s right…

 

IMG_8750
Mountain bikers love this kind of scene! A trail, a view, leading to sweet singletrack.

Moab is where it mostly all started.  When I was just getting into riding my mountain bike, some time around 1984, I made my first trip to Moab.  That trip was done with a steel rigid hardtail Ritchey. I think it was a Ritchey Ascent.  Tig welded steel that came with a really bitchin' all in one bull moose handlebar.  A rigid steel fork and a set of brakes that could only at best slow you down and with considerable hand effort at that. 

Back in those days, a trip around the Slickrock trail or a day coming down Porcupine Rim was an all-day affair.  You see, you couldn't ride very long.  Your tail end would be killing you.  You had to pick your way around all the rough stuff, as your only way of absorbing anything was with your body.  Your hands would be so destroyed that on any downhill they would cramp up, forcing you to stop entirely once the ability to squeeze the levers had gone. 

IMG_0075

Reset – Moab trip May 2014. 

2.5 days, 3 rides.

Where have you been my mountain biker self?  Wow, I love this stuff.

So, if you have not been to Moab lately – you need to go.  The old jeep trails that we used to ride a long time ago have mostly been replaced with sweet singletrack.  The terrain is still burly, but with a bike like a Slash or Remedy you will be amazed at what you can ride that was a challenge back in the day (it was all uphill – both ways back then). 

UPS

LPS

Captain Ahab

Amasa Back

I landed in Grand Junction and hightailed it to Moab.  Colorado and Utah highways have a speed limit of 75, which is already way faster than at home.  But, then you combine that with the propensity for people in the area to drive 10 over and you have a damn fast highway.  My bags were late, and I was just a wuss, so was about an hour or so late getting to Moab.  Once I arrived, I assembled my bike and headed out with the crew to ride Amasa Back trail.  The number of times we have done that over the years can almost not be counted.  It is a way way better trail now than back then though.  We topped that evening off with a visit to the Moab Brewery.  Unfortunately, they did not have their Belgian on so I burned the place down (not really). 

The next day was a testing day.  We did a bunch of smaller loops and then another trip on a different loop on Amasa Back.  Pizza and Moab Brewery were on tap again, as this is all just leading up to the Enchilada. 

Yep, that is right, we had plans to do the Whole Enchilada.  But neigh, we could not get up to the top.  Ugh.  Foiled again.  Oh well, ¾ of the Enchilada is still a darn good meal.  Fast sweeping descents, lots of techy stuff and some dang fine scenery.  It was about a 5 hour ride that day – so big big fun was had.  I cannot wait to try to get back there in the next couple of years. 

IMG_8739
I want one of these. This is the coolest camper, mountain biking, motorcycling thing ever.
IMG_8741
When in Moab...
Screen Shot 2014-05-09 at 8.12.17 AM
It is an amazing place.

So, now it is my mountain biking year.  A bunch of mountain bike trips and outings planned. 

The USA, Europe, my first Enduro, a Whistler trip, a big Alps rendezvous.  The problem is choice.  In this reset of the matrix, it is the mountain bike that will rise from Zion.  I do it all a lot slower than I used to, but the grin on my face is bigger than ever.  I hope to do it all and reconnect with the group of people that I have maybe ignored over the years, but not forgotten.  Now, if I could just get myself one of those cool long overcoats with the stand up collar…

 

 I think this says it all.  Occasionally, the Matrix needs to be reset.  The problem is choice.

Go for a ride!

Joe


April 19, 2014

Just What Is In Those Frites Anyway?

Have you ever wondered what it feels like to be underwater and not be able to breathe?  Or to have someone punch you in the stomach so hard you cannot catch your breath?  Or to have a whole pile of ants dropped in your pants? Or to bungee jump upside down towards the rushing water below you?  Or to own so many converse shoes that you cannot get anything g into your closet?  Or to eat a complete German chocolate cake in one sitting?  Or to be the tallest person in the room on a Wednesday?  Well, I really cannot answer most if not all of those things.  I can tell you that watching the nail bitter that Flanders was, from the fan club, while being the owner of the team that was attempting to win it and then did win it is really really hard to breathe through.
IMG_8498
Liz enjoying a couple of Westvleteren's
 
You may not realize it yet, but you are here to find out what what it feels like to own a cycling team and to win the Ronde VanVlaanderen.  (Soon you will be wondering what the air speed velocity if an unladen swallow is). I can tell you this, it does not feel anything like the 2nd coming of Zog. I think it very much feels exactly like Arthur Dent felt like when he accidentally missed the ground.
 
In all seriousness... We won frigging Flanders!  I do not think I was able to breathe for at least a day afterward.  If you know me, you know that my love affair with cycling is all based on the first Sunday in April. The first Sunday in April is by far the best single day of bike racing all year long. The granddad of them all is the Tour of Flanders. To me (and to you, you just have not come to realize it yet),  Flanders makes all other bike races pale. Sure Paris Roubaix is a great race, sure Liege is a crazy hard race, sure the Giro is amazing, sure the TDF is long and beautiful, but nothing tops the Tour of Flanders.
IMG_8518
The Kwaremont is a very special place! The week before the race you will see all kinds of people making their pilgrimage there.
 
Firstly, Flanders takes place in Belgium.  All races in Belgium are more exciting than races that are not in Belgium. The crowds for a race in Belgium are not like crowds for other races. There is just something in the water in Belgium. I think people are born with an innate knowledge and love for cycling. I think if your genetic lineage did not like cycling, your ancestors were ran off to America a long time ago. The cycling gene in Belgium is a given.
 
Secondly, Flanders has all the great stuff that makes a bike race great. Unpredictable weather, crosswind, crazy steep climbs, skinny little roads, cobbles sometimes flat but often pitched up, frites, Belgian beer.
 
Thirdly, real hardmen win Flanders. Guys with beards that can put out 1500 watts and can suffer.  Skinny little waifs tremble at the thought of racing Flanders.
 
Fourthly, at the bottom of the Kwaremont, about 18 kilometers from the finish, there are still 20 people that could win. It all comes down to positioning and who has the gas at that point after racing 5 hours to get to that point.  This leads to the best single hour of bike racing all year.
 
Fifthly. Eddy won it, but still says it was the hardest race to figure out. His name is Merckx by the way.
 
Sixthly. Belgian beer. Don't even try to tell me you do not like Belgian beer. And at the risk of offending my Belgian friends, don't think that Belgian beer is represented by that crummy Stella Artois you can buy at the supermarket. Real Belgian beer comes in a great glass and has a wonderful head on it and makes you feel like your name is Mueseuw. Belgian beer also goes really well with frites.
 
Lastly, they do not even have a government in Belgium. And you know what, they do not actually need one. How cool is that?  So no Roger, you should not run for president, it's unnecessary.
 
IMG_8604
This is what it feels like when you win Flanders!
 
On this years first Sunday in April, I was lucky to be the team owner on site for the most important day of our young team. The day when Trek Factory Racing conquered the day. I always say that owning a team you will loose wy more races than you will win, but if you are going to win one, make it Flanders.  As I said, it is after all the race of races.  
 
I watched the first 4 hours of the race from a few different places along the course. I watched the last hour of the race from the fan club event of the big screen. I was a complete nervous wreck for the entire hour. Fabian and Dirk turned out to have nerves of steel and the balls to risk not winning to make the race. It was an incredible moment, and one I will never forget or top for the rest of my life.
 
IMG_8599
If you do win Flanders, afterward the bus is turned into a disco.
 
IMG_8596
But you do have to watch out that Jesse Seargent doesn't try to steal the trophy.
 
The 2014 Flanders race ranks as one if the best races in the history of bike racing. At the finish there was a lot of hugging and I could not breathe nor could I hold back the tears of joy. I called Luca and to him I loved him. I drive immediately to the finish where the bus was, and made a compete spectacle of myself by hugging anyone there.
 
After when Fabian returned to the bus there was champagne and dancing. At the hotel I filmed Fabian on his daughters scooter. At dinner with the team I could not hardly give a speech of congratulations, so choked up was I.
 
When it was all said and done I know that I had way too many beers. I could not really function the next day.
 
And that was how my Flanders went this year. Only 11 months till Flanders again next year. In the mean time, I do not know about you, I need some frites and a Westvleteren.
 
Out
Joe
 
IMG_8593
Liz found Elvis living in Flanders.
 
IMG_8524
Even scooters in Belgium have a beer theme.

 

IMG_8536
Wouter built a really cool model copy of Fabian's bike and was able to present it to him. Very cool.
IMG_8555
One of the displays at the Flanders museum shows that if you win, you will probably have really bad hair.
IMG_8595
The crush outside the bus in Oudenaarde
894494_10152454611625934_5147425985912880450_o
Breathe!
IMG_8426
I can tell you what it is like to go to Brown county and ride your mountain bike, but that is not really why you are here. And now, a man with 2 noses.
 
 

April 04, 2014

A Day Spent in The Candy Store of Flanders, #2days

A Day Spent In The Candy Store!

Eickenberg, Paterberg, Taaienberg, Kwarmont, Koppenberg, Molenberg.  OMG, riding in Belgium in April is Heaven...Heaven.  

 

The climbs of East Flanders are tough.  They can be impossibly steep and sometime with the absurdity of cobbles thrown in.  You will need your smallest gear and it hurts.  Your legs scream at you to stop, but do not be tempted.  If you do stop, you will never get going.  You also cannot stand up, as you bike tire cannot retain traction if you do.  So you push a way to big gear and your speed goes down to impossibly slow.  You will just not believe how much faster Fabian and Tom can do this climb.

If you have not yet been there yet, you need to go.  Get a map, get a bike, get some friends and head out in Flanders.  You can follow signs from one of the many races that use these roads. Ride 50 or 60 or 70 miles and you will find you are now in the galactic center of cycling.  You will see hundreds of other cyclists along the way.  Buckaroo Banzai would approve, because there you are.   

We started our day at the restaurant on the Kwaremont, and traced along 105 kilometers of the 2013 E3 route.  If ever there was a road to ride segment that the Inner Ring could write about, it is here.  

On a beautiful spring day, riding in this part of Belgium is certainly the equivalent of a pilgrimage to Mecca for a cyclist.  It is great fun seeing other large groups of cyclists tackling the same hills and routes that you are.  All of you experiencing the same elation.  

And, there is the lovely squeek of the tires over the road.  

This Sunday is going to be an epic day.  I have never actually seen Flanders in person.  It is my absolute favorite bike race, yet I have always watched it on the internet and never in person.  It is the grand daddy of all the races out there, and I will finally get to see it in person.  I cannot wait.  

Shazbot nanu nanu!

Out

Joe

 

IMG_8511
My steed for the trip. A team edition Domane!

 

IMG_8492
We started our trip at the Galactic Center of beer. Westvleteren

 

IMG_8498
Did you know you can get Beer and Frites in Belgium? Even the Gluten free girl is willing to relax that a little while here.
IMG_8514
Chad in front of the coolest mural ever.
IMG_8518
The Kwaremont has it's own beer, and of course I had to buy a Go Fabian scarf.

April 02, 2014

What is in your bag? #5days

Just what is in that bag?  Holy cow it is BIG!  

Yep, I am bringing it all.  I am heading to Belgium, you know.  The land of frites and good beer and cobbled climbs and crosswinds and winding roads and everything good about cycling.  I plan to eat frites every day, ride my bike a ton, try not to fall down on the cobbles, drink a lot of good Belgian beer and cheer my head off for the race on Sunday.  

I will need a lot of gear for that.  As I was packing I thought, "Holy Cow that is a lot of gear."  I stood back and took it all in, and sure enough I can verify - that is a lot of gear.  I do have a bag big enough to swallow it all up - it even has my name on it (dork).  

 

IMG_8485
I do have a bag big enough. It is BIG!

 

 

 

IMG_8481
Swallows lots of gear.

 

 

IMG_8476
When I laid it all out, I thought "I have just got to catalog that". So, for your pleasure...This is what a guy going to Belgium for Flanders brings with him. Go ahead laugh out loud now.

 

 

Without further adieu, her it is, the whole list.

Oakley Racing Jacket glasses – prescription lenses

Shimano Dura Ace pedals

Garmin 810

Bontrager Profila Race windshell gloves

Bontrager RL Fusion Gell Foam full finger gloves

2 Bontrager windvests

2 Bontrager long sleeve jerseys

2 Bontrager arm warmers

2 Bontrager knee warmers

1 Bontrager winter bootie

1 Bontrager spring bootie

1 Bontrager RXL winter fitting shoe - I have more than one shoe, and this is the medium last so that I can fit extra socks if I need to.

3 Bontrager RXL short sleeve Jersey

3 Bontrager RXL bib shorts

1 Bontrager RL winter bib short

1 Bontrager hooded base layer

1 Bontrager B3 base layer

1 Bontrager B2 base layer

2 Bontrager  B1 base layer

Bontrager Neck gaiter

Bontrager Waterproof Breathable packable jacket - it will not rain

Bontrager Lightweight Packable windjacket - it will rain

Trek Factory racing rain jacket - The surest way to have it race on Flanders race day is to not bring a rain jacket.

Magic sleep aid (This is my combination of Melatonin, Magnesium and Zinc).  Works magic for Jetlag induced insomnia.  

Various Honey Stinger

Skratch Labs drink mix

Trek Factory Racing wash bag - Don't know if I will do laundry or not, but even if not it is a good bag for the dirty gear.

Gore tex hat for under the helmet

Starbucks Via coffee

Raffa Paris Roubaix challenge cycling cap

TFR Bontrager hooded base layer - if it is cold on race day

Raffa Embrocation

Raffa Chamois crème

Bontrager Velocis helmet

Helly Hanson helmet under layer

2 pair levis 514 jeans

2 Prana long sleeve shirts

1 North Face pullover sweater

1 TFR Patagonia hoodie

4 tshirts

1 Leather Belt IMBA.com belt buckle

5 pair Bontrager Profila cycling socks (5” minimum – non of those silly short socks)

2 pair of Bontrager Profila compression socks

Converse (duh)

Nike work out trainers

Bluntstone boots

Work out shorts and shirt

6 pair of underwear

Bathroom kit

 

Ok I know you are laughing now.  I am laughing as well.

#5days till race day!

Joe


March 12, 2014

I'm Fat, You're Fat, Everyone's Fat!

  IMG_0048

"Man, those bikes are goofy."  

I am not sure if that was my exact words or not, but it pretty much sums up how I referred to FatBikes two years ago.  I had good reason.  They are goofy, afterall.  If you said that everyone in Belgium grows up with one and that is what makes them all great cobbles riders or cyclocross riders, of course I would have to have one - just because.  Afterall, short of burritos (Texas), coffee (Italy and Handlebar Coffee in Santa Barbara), #Joetmeal (my kitchen) and Pearl Jam (Seattle) - all the other really excellent things in life come from Belgium (beer, frites, cyclocross racing, Classics, beer, Atomium, chocolate, Eddy Merckx, beer, etc...)

Getting back to FatBikes, they are just goofy.  Big. Pigish. Bouncy. Slow. All of those adjectives can be applied. I mean, look at the size of the tires!  They are so large.  If you think 29'er tires look large, take a look over here, it's like they have their own zip code or something.  Holy cow.  Makes me think of this movie clip.  

 

That always cracks me up.  There are about 5 different versions of that clip on YouTube.  Do yourself a laughfest and watch all of them.  Great stuff.

But back to this Fatness thing.  They really are goofy.  Turns out though, they are a riot. Holy cow, they are fun.  You will find yourself bouncing along on a tiny bit of trail with an absolute ear to ear grin on your face.  

What's amazing to me is how the cycling world has taken to the things.  This was a thing that only Surly was doing a few years ago.  Now, every self respecting bicycle company has one.  Some are great, some are not.  But the point is that there are just a ton of choices now.  Once you have one, you learn a lot about what they will and will not do.  

Here is my summary of what's required for snow riding:

- You need a trail.  Contrary to what the bike looks like it will do, you cannot just ride the thing anywhere. If it is going to be singletrack, it will need to have been packed down by snowshoes or other riders at a minimum.  The best trails are the trails that are being prepped specifically for Fat Bikes.  Groomed just like ski trails are groomed, only with something not much wider than a normal ribbon of singletrack would be.

- Falling is not that big of a deal.  Rest assured you will fall, you are riding along on frozen water afterall.  You will be riding along, your front wheel will veer over into the soft snow and poof, into the powder you plop.  But, you are falling into snow.  Generally, you just create a mangled snow angel.  

- They are bouncy and you go slow.  I think there are probably people that can make these things go fast, I am just not one of them.  Seems like a whole bunch of work.  But, you will not mind going slow.  In fact, you will finally find yourself enjoying the woods and the silence of being in the woods when covered in snow.  It is fun to ride along following deer hoof prints from the night before.  

- Dogs love snow bikes.  Dogs like to sniff around and eat dead stuff in the woods.  Normally, on a summer mountain bike ride they miss out.  It is just an all out chase and run for them.  In the winter, they can sniff and eat dead stuff all ride, because you are not dropping them.  

IMG_8217

It appears to me, that here in the upper midwest the concept of Fatbiking is growing like crazy.  There are race series developing, many new trails that have sprouted up, lots of blogs and people talking about things, cool movies, a new national championship (Ned Overend who won his first MTB race about 62 years ago won - geez).  Take a look at a few of those things here.  And get out on your Fat.

 

Check out Hansi Johnson's blog site.  Hansi is the upper midwest IMBA rep, and a FatBike fan.  Also a great photographer.

Wisconsin race series (although I am still not sold on racing one of these things). www.wisfatbikeracing.com/

http://greatlakesfatbikeseries.blogspot.com

At Wisconsin Fat Bike, you can find links for trails and other info.

This film is about as inspiring as you will find about Fat Bike riding.  Watch it all the way to the end, and you will get the inspiration about the whole thing.  (Almost makes it so that winter could be something looked forward to.)

 

Going for a ride.

Joe

 

 

 

 


March 01, 2014

The War Starts Here!

Cobbles-700x394
The beauty of Flanders!

Today is March 1.  That is a significant date for a lot of reasons.  

1.  Winter sucks, and somewhere along there in March the beginnings of the end of Winter will happen.  A day of 45 degree weather when the snow will clear off the roads, birds return from their southern homes, you can get out for a road ride, a trail will clear within driving distance that we can go and ride a mountain bike etc...  You get the picture - Winter, I am breaking up with you. TIme that I start to see other seasons.

2.  More importantly, the REAL professional bike racing season starts.  Omloop Het Nieuwsblad , KBK, Ghent-Wevelgem, E3 etc...  This is what bike racing is all about.  This is where hard men like Roger De Vlaeminck, Eddie Merckx, Freddy Maertens, Johan Museeuw, Eddy Planckaert, Jan Raas et al. became heroes.  

There absolutely will not be pictures of riders with cute baby kangaroos.  I mean, I like kangaroos and koala bears as much as the rest of you, but seriously.  No offence to my Aussie friends, that is not bike racing.  Riding around in shorts and jersey working on your tan lines in January is not bike racing.   Real bike racing should contain a constant risk of hypothermia for riders and fans, brutal cobbles, crazy steep climbs probably littered with those same absurd cobbles, mad spectators, an abundance of roadside purveyors of the only beer that actually counts, glorious frites with mayonaise, horrendous crosswinds on roads and in towns with names that I cannot say.  (I mean, If you are not from Belgium what is Flemish anyway?)

Flanders_1
I love this old photo of Jan Raas giving someone what for during Flanders.

This is where it really begins. This is where bicycle racing is real.  This is where it all starts for all of us.  This is where the men are tough and women are tough also.  (They have no choice)  I recognize that it’s a big world out there and bike racing happens other places in the world.  But, in the end there is only one Belgium.  Belgium is the galactic center of cycling afterall.  Cycling is somehow in the water here.  I think babies are shown how to shave their legs in the hospital, handed a cycling cap and a training program and sent out the door with a learner bike.  

The rest of the cycling season could go away forever, and Belgium would not actually change at all.  Hordes of crazy fans would still turn out to see their countrymen smash cyclocross races, semi-classics, the classics etc...  Those races would just keep on marching.  It is a glorious place.  

Vequee-hinault
If you don't think those guys were hard asses, think again.

So if you are like me, get the laptop out and figure out all the wonderful places you can stream the races (do yourself a favor and follow one of the Flemish sources, it really does complete the experience), run down to your local beer haunt and clean them out of Leffe or Trappist Ale, learn to make frites, and enjoy.  Imagine you are in Oudenaarde, and remember that screaming is well accepted.  Listen closely, you can probably hear me.

Enjoy,

Joe

Koppenberg tumble
Hopefully this sort of thing doesn't happen today, but it may.

January 19, 2014

Trek Factory Racing zooms into existence!

 Zoom Zoom - like the Mazda commercial says.  (That is said mazz-duh, if you are Canadian.  Just wanted to make sure that any Canadians out there got the reference.)  This of course has absolutely nothing to do with the rest of this post.  Just-sayin.

IMG_8104
Trek Factory Racing Is Here!

So last week we launched to the world the new team.  If you have been following along, you know this is something that we have been working on for some time.  If not, just know that we have.  Seriously, we have.  If you need proof of that, give this a read.

The TDU starts next week, as does San Luis.  We are racing at both, and just like that the season gets started.  After all the work and planning, we are finally racing.  It has been a lot of work. I never knew how much work it was.  The riders riding in a race is only just a small portion of what has to happen to operate a cycling team.

I am really proud of the list of things we have done in the past months.  

Signed 28 rides.

Hired 40 staff people.

Acquired all of the vehicles necessary to run a cycling team.   14 cars, 2 buses, 2 trucks, 2 sprinters.  The all have to have a design done, and get them wrapped and outfitted with radios and bike racks etc...  

When you start a team, there is an initial amount of equipment necessary that is staggering.  Hundreds of bikes need to be designed, built, painted, assembled shipped all over the world.  The clothing designed and sourced, each rider has to be fit individually.  New gear had to be designed in some cases.

We built a new team website, which if you have not yet seen it you should check it out.  We are proud of it. www.trekfactoryracing.com.  

We launched a new concept with a Team Fan Club.  This might be the most important thing that we do with the team.  (I know a team races bikes, but after that the most important thing is the fans.)  A team only survives if it cultivates a group of fans.  We think you do that by being part of the culture of the sport.  By being fans of the sport ourselves.  After all, if we did not love racing there really wouldn't be much of a point in doing this.  We are building a team that is all about honoring the sport and showing up to race hard.  We hope people see that.  But don't just take my word for it, join the fan club here.  For now it is free and you can always opt out if you don't feel it later.

While we are doing all of that, there are training camps, UCI paperwork, and cultivating relationships with sponsors, cultivating relationships with national cycling federations and on and on. It has been a few months at Trek where people have been just full gas 24/7.  

But we are here.  We have a team and we have launched it.  I like to say, "We are an international team, owned by a US company, licensed in the USA, based in Belgium, with a roster of 17 different nationalities, that launched in France, and when you take away our 2 oldest riders - we might be the youngest average age team in the World Tour."  

IMG_8100
European's are lucky. They get cool wagons like these. They are going to leave an impression in the field for sure.

So I have collected a bunch of videos about the launch.  The 1st one is one I put together.  The rest I found on the web.  

On to the races!

Joe

 

 

 The next one was done by a fan.  They must have taken our intro video, and pulled the music and some of the visual from there.  They did an amazing job of it.

 

 The next one is from Shimano.  Shimano is a co-sponsor of the team and they will have alot of content all year long about the team on their site.  Be sure to check that out.

 

The next one is some of the story of developing the riders and the equipement for the riders.  This one is from our video studio and shows alot of the effort behind the team and why Trek is doing the team.  

 

 The last 2 here came from a fun little blog site called Father and Son tour.

 

 

 


January 10, 2014

Goals!

A person has to have goals.  Like, drink more water, or ride your bike more or try not to curse.  I have tried to tell people that goals are important.  Without goals, what are you...dead!  One day, when I reach the end of the internet, maybe I won't have any goals. Mostly people just glaze over when I talk with them about goals. Hmmm, maybe it is just me...

It will be odd, and require a red hand letting the gas off and adding 2 numbers together while taking a shower ski racing while on the way to work eating an orange.  But, in soccer they have goals - so does hockey.  For crying out loud, that means the Canadians have goals.  If the Canadians can do it (the happiest friendliest people in the world), I am certain I can...I mean for real, they have more winter than the rest of us and they're still happy.  It's due to this that I will have goals every year from here sideways.  Given how cold it is outside later, we will take some time with this.

Last year I published my goals.  They were exhaustive, and I was exhausted.  I have always had goals, just never linked them to this blogsite.  I have always wanted to see the Grand Canyon, and I have never done that, either. I have spent a lot of time in Belgium though.

So without further hesitation and build up, here they are.  A pile of really well considered goals. Um, sort of well considered.  If not well considered, they are at least spelled right, as I ran them through the spell checker.

1.  Go to Hawaii Ironman.  I have never been, and Hanna's boyfriend qualified.  Seems like the perfect time to go.
2.  See Pearl Jam.  Duh.  I am not even going to explain this one.        

IMG_7744
If you haven't been, then you really don't understand what you are missing.

3. Ride Flanders citizen race.  The best road bike race of the year.  If you can only go and see one race, make it this one.  The course is incredible, the Belgian crowd is incredible.  Riding it the day before the pro race is an unforgettable experience.

PIC356216902
I will never look like this going up the Koppenberg

4.  Visit my father in North Carolina. 
5.  Visit my mother and have her come to Wisconsin.
6.  Make a decision on our property in Hayward.
7.  Ride Whole Enchilada.  Duh.  Check it.

 

 

8. Make a decision on our house.  Keep or sell it.
9. Ride Whistler. Duh. Check it again.

 
10. Do a MTB trip with Lloyd.  Here is the link to the last trip I did with Lloyd.  Read it, and you will know why I cannot wait to do it again with him.  
11. Learn to take tight switchback turns on my Slash.  If you read the story on the previous entry, you know what I am talking about.
12. Wave at all cyclists that I see.
13. Drink more water.  I should be drinking 116oz per day.  Typical goals entry.
14. Trim the number of bikes in my garage to:
      2 MTB (Fuel EX 29, Slash 27.5)
      1 Road bike (Flanders Domane)
      1 Fat Bike
      1 Cyclocross Bike
      1 Jump/Pump track bike - Really, does a person need more than that?  Some people would say yes (normally I'd be one of them), but I am going to do my best to pull it down to those.
15. Do a road bike trip.  I do like riding my road bike, and more importantly it is what Liz really really likes.
16. Master small and medium double jumps on my slopestyle bike
17. Learn to wheelie on both my favorite mountain bike and my motorcycle.  I have said before that this is a genetic skill.  I am going to take the year and learn to wheelie, or at least just about kill myself trying.  By the end of the year, I will either wheelie or it will be a lost cause.

 

18. Take Liz and girls to NYC  Liz has been all over the world, but not to NYC. 
19. Change my bikes to tubeless.  It is 2014, it is time to move into 2010.  Now that I can do all my bikes, I am going to go there full time.
20. Ride Copper Harbor
21. Ride 3 MTB Enduro races
22. Ride a race with Noah
23. Ride a race with Russel
24. Make the Gravity MTB project in Wisconsin a reality.
25. Drink more beer. (Belgian of course) 
26. Do at least 8 CX races.
27. Win a CX race.
28. Read 3 personal books.
29. Read 3 professional books.
30. Get more involved with my community.  Give time, get involved with a local cause directly.
31. Find a good charity that we can align with.
32. Fix my garage floor
33. Preseason training camp in Feb/March – St. Joe or Georgia
34. Win a GNCC in my class. In 2011, I was 4th at Ironman GNCC, then 5th at the first Loretta’s and won the 2nd Loretta’s race. This past year I got a 6th at Ironman and then 5th at Loretta’s. Close, but not quite there.

IMG_2932
I've stood there before, I would like to again.

35. Win WIXC old guy class. I have become a huge fan of the WIXC series. They are the best races in Wisconsin. I plan to do most if not all, and hope to win my class.
36. Learn to use the rear brake while using the throttle on my 250F. I am still struggling with this skill. I think it is imperative for me to get this skill if I have any hope of winning a GNCC race.
37. Master flat corners on my 250F.
38. Buy Aztalan membership and get better at jumping my 250F.
39. Get one of those really cool Bluetooth phone devices that allow you to walk along in the airport talking to yourself out loud.  You look so cool while doing that. 
40. Shop more out of the SkyMall Delta magazine.  They are such wonderful gift giving sources. 
41. Get a Bablefish installed.
42. Put together the plan to climb Kilimanjaro with Liz.

There are 8 more, but they are work specific, so I can't tell you those.  You know the drill, if I tell you I would have to blah blah blah...

GOAAAAAAAALLLLLL!

Out,

Joe